Meriwether Lewis & Metal Ford

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Now that the Marines have gone, I will get back to my roll of Kodak Portra 400. If you have not seen my last post on the invasion of Marines in Nashville, check it out here. You will be treated to a slide show of several pictures of the events throughout Marine Week including an air show and ground invasion. Picking up from my last post of Portra pics, this post has more landscape pictures from the Natchez Trace Parkway.

All photos in this post were taken on the same overcast day. I found myself further West than normal so I stopped by the Meriwether Lewis Monument in Lewis County. Meriwether Lewis was an explorer and a soldier. He and William Clark were commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson to explore the newly obtained Louisiana Purchase in 1804. They were better known as Lewis and Clark. The goal was to map out the new land and to establish an American presence before others could take claim. Just a few years after the exploration, Lewis died. To this day, there is still a mystery surrounding his death. It was ruled a suicide, but some say the evidence points to murder. After a little research, I believe I would lean toward murder. Nonetheless, a monument was erected over his grave. The shaft part of the monument in the picture below is actually broken. It was design this way to represent a life cut too short.

 

 

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Meriwether Lewis Monument – Natchez Trace Parkway – Olympus OM1 / 50mm f1.8 / Kodak Portra 400 / The FINDLab

 

 

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Meriwether Lewis Monument – Natchez Trace Parkway – Olympus OM1 / 50mm f1.8 / Kodak Portra 400 / The FINDLab

 

 

Some patriot paid their respects and left a flag in the monument.

 

 

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Meriwether Lewis Monument – Natchez Trace Parkway – Olympus OM1 / 50mm f1.8 / Kodak Portra 400 / The FINDLab

 

 

Before leaving, I grabbed a shot of of the Old Trace sign near the monument.

 

 

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Meriwether Lewis Monument / Old Trace – Natchez Trace Parkway – Olympus OM1 / 50mm f1.8 / Kodak Portra 400 / The FINDLab

 

 

I made one more stop that day before heading home. I can’t remember the last time I made the stop at Metal Ford. There isn’t any trace of it, but this stop was the scene of a coal fired furnace used to create pig iron. With the Buffalo River running close by, this area is a nice place to picnic and a great place to start your canoe trip. In fact, while I was there, a family pulled in with their canoes in tow. I pulled out my tripod and mount for the following shots with the exception of the tree trunk. The overcast sky coupled with the large depth of field I required for the landscapes, produced low shutter speeds, speeds that warranted the sturdiness of a tripod.

 

 

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Metal Ford – Natchez Trace Parkway – Olympus OM1 / 28mm f3.5 / Kodak Portra 400 / The FINDLab

 

 

Metal Ford - Natchez Trace Parkway - Olympus OM1 / 28mm f3.5 / Kodak Portra 400 / The FINDLab
Metal Ford – Natchez Trace Parkway – Olympus OM1 / 28mm f3.5 / Kodak Portra 400 / The FINDLab

 

 

Metal Ford - Natchez Trace Parkway - Olympus OM1 / 28mm f3.5 / Kodak Portra 400 / The FINDLab
Metal Ford – Natchez Trace Parkway – Olympus OM1 / 50mm f1.8 / Kodak Portra 400 / The FINDLab

 

 

Metal Ford - Natchez Trace Parkway - Olympus OM1 / 50mm f1.8 / Kodak Portra 400 / The FINDLab
Metal Ford – Natchez Trace Parkway – Olympus OM1 / 50mm f1.8 / Kodak Portra 400 / The FINDLab

 

 

Before heading out, I took one digital shot, a portrait of my Olympus OM1 with the 28mm f3.5 mounted. I am currently using this shot for my Facebook cover. This is the camera I used for the images in this post.

 

 

Olympus OM1 with OM Zuiko 28mm f3.5
Olympus OM1 with OM Zuiko 28mm f3.5 – Taken with an Olympus E520 DSLR and Sigma 30mm f1.4

 

 

Thanks for reading! I’m working on finishing a roll of Ektar in my OM1 and I am still working on a roll of TRI-X in my Mamiya. I hope to have something to post from these rolls soon, so stay in touch.

 

 

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